1928 – Royal Horticultural Society’s Great Spring Show (Chelsea)

The 1927 schedule of running the show from Wednesday to Friday was repeated in 1928, when the show was held between 23rd and 25th May inclusive. The firm was again allotted Space K, on Main Avenue, costing £52-10s[1]. Messrs. William Wood & Son Ltd., of Taplow, occupied one adjacent site[2] and Messes. W.H. Gaze & Sons Ltd., of Kingston-on-Thames, hard tennis court and accessory manufacturers, on the other.

 

1928 – Royal Horticultural Society’s Great Spring Show (Chelsea)

Although the site was not the one that they asked for and despite having had a “grouse” about the situation, they recognised that it was “not a bad pitch”. Notwithstanding being the same size and the same space number as the previous year the site was not exactly in the same location as the previous year. It was located at the Embankment end of Main Avenue. More importantly the firm was the first horticultural builder’s for those approaching the Avenue from the Embankment. Despite some talk of a more radical change, their exhibits only varied subtly from previous years and included a 26ft. 6in. by 12ft. patent construction span-roof greenhouse with gable entrance, 3ft. wide iron staging with fibre cement sheets[3], 3 ft. wide wood slatted staging, wood lath blinds to part of the front and one side of roof below ventilator, roof wiring to greenhouse 16in. from glass on one side only; 12ft. by 8ft. amateur span-roof with boarding below sill, wood slatted staging to both sides; No 660 12ft. by 4ft. lean-to frame for attaching to side of amateur span-roof greenhouse; No. 657, 8ft. by 7ft. lifting ridge frame; No 654, 6ft. by 4ft. span-roof frame; No. 661, 4ft. by 3ft. lean-to frame; No. 652, 12ft. by 6ft. Span-roof frame; No. 658, 8ft. by 6ft. and 6ft. by 4ft. lean-to frames; Nos. 36 and 46 Quorn boiler; Nos. 1, 2 and 3 Loughborough boilers; Nos. 1 and 2 Garden Seats; Coke Crusher and stand.

 

1928 – Royal Horticultural Society’s Great Spring Show (Chelsea)

During the show they sold the show amateur span-roof greenhouse to Mr. G. D. Lyell, of West Hoathly, Sussex, who wanted the structure and the accompanying No 660 frame lengthening to 16ft. The overall price including lengthening and heating (Plan B) amounted to £64 11s. for which Messenger’s quoted £64. The price of the standard 12ft. by 8ft. greenhouse was £34 5s. including stages and boarding; the price for increasing to 16ft. (including stages and boarding) was £80 15s. The price for the 12ft. long frame was £7 5s. with an additional £2 5s. for the extension. A second 12ft. by 8ft. amateur span-roof on boarding, together with lean-to frames and stages, was sold to Mrs. Summers, Coombe End, Kingston-upon-Thames.

 

1928 – Royal Horticultural Society’s Great Spring Show (Chelsea)

They also sold the show No. 652 span-roof frame to Mr. Wire, of Northcote, Turnberry, Argyllshire for £16 10s.; two No. 657 frames, the 8ft. by 7ft. model displayed at the show to Mr. Gower, of Kia-Ora, Templewood Road, Hadleigh, Essex and a 12ft. by 7ft. that was not at the show to Colonel E.H.W. Bolitho[4], of Trengwainton House, Madron, Cornwall. A No. 661 2-light frame was sold to Mrs. Harding, of Colinton, Midlothian. During the course of the three days they received at least 30 enquiries, a similar number to the previous year, again a number of them eventually leading to orders.

 

References:

  1. The plot had a frontage of 35ft. with a depth of 30ft. and charged at the rate of £1-10s per ft. of frontage.
  2. Wood’s also had stands on Monument Road and Sundries Avenue (Nos. 19 & 20).
  3. Messenger’s first starting using fibre cement sheets in their show house in 1926. These were normally bought specifically for the show from The British Fibrocement Works Ltd., whose Head Offices were in Erith, Kent and local offices in Bristol, London, Manchester and Birmingham. The sheets varied in size from year to year but were normally ½in. thick and costing 5s. 6d. per square yard.
  4. In 1961 Colonel Sir Edward Bolitho gave Trengwainton House and gardens to the National Trust.