1930 – Royal Horticultural Society’s Great Spring Show (Chelsea)

It appears that for the 1930, which ran from 21st to 23rd May inclusive, the firm was allocated a 37ft. by 20ft. site for £37, located on the east side of Monument Road. The site again essentially had two frontages, being almost reverse of last year’s. For the first time at the show, they displayed a No. 664 8ft. by 6ft. peach case, with sloping front, to suit a 10ft. high back wall. The rest of their exhibits were fairly standard, though dry glazing was used on both the two greenhouses and the peach case. The latter whilst not selling, did apparently attract a large amount of interest.

 

1930 – Royal Horticultural Society’s Great Spring Show (Chelsea)
1930 – Royal Horticultural Society’s Great Spring Show (Chelsea)

The firm’s workers who erected and dismantled the exhibits at the show received expenses, as for any job. These were obviously paid in arrears, which meant that life could become difficult for some individuals, particularly when having to pay London prices. One such individual who found himself in difficulties was W. Poole, who being an apprentice found it difficult to manage the additional expense and was forced to write to the firm’s management explaining his problems. His board and lodging expenses for one week was £9 2s., which he was finding exorbitant and was being forced to sleep on a settee at one house and take his meals at another.

 

1930 – Royal Horticultural Society’s Great Spring Show (Chelsea)

One of the orders that resulted from around 50 enquiries taken at the show was from Mr. R. Barratt, a member of the Barratt shoe family, who was in the process of building a new residence at St. David’s[1], Harborough Road, Kingsthorpe, Northampton. He appears to have been recommended to the firm by both his gardener Mr. George Fry and George Whitelegg[2], a landscape gardener, who was responsible for laying out the grounds. The outcome was an order for 50ft. by 12ft. ¾ span-roof range, which included a vinery and plant house, together with wood stages, slatted wood walks, wood shelves, rain water cisterns and heating apparatus (including No. 26 Quorn boiler), all to be fixed by the firm. Mr. Barrett arranged for the brick foundations to be completed by Messrs. A. Glenn & Sons, Ltd[3]. The total price was £333 5s., which include £5 commission[4] to Messrs. William Barron of Borrowash, Derbyshire.

 

1930 – Royal Horticultural Society’s Great Spring Show (Chelsea)
1930 – Royal Horticultural Society’s Great Spring Show (Chelsea)

 

References:

  1. The house, built in 1882, occupies the site of the Hospital of St David founded 1200. The last remains of which, were demolished in 1928, with a new side wing being added in 1931. The house was later used as a school and in 2011, after restoration, it was opened as a specialist care home for adults with acquired brain injuries.
  2. (c.1877-1957) – noted for his rock and water gardens at the Chelsea Flower Shows
  3. Of Chaucer Street, Kingsley Place, Northampton.
  4. The £5 commission comprised of £3 for the structure; £1 for the staging and £1 for the heating.