The “Ideal” Cookanheat

The Architectural Review, Vol 53, May 1923

For a relatively short period in the mid-1920s they sold the Ideal ‘Cookandheat’, which as its name implies combined the ability to cook with provided direct or in-direct hot-water, via an additional cylinder. Two of the three models, all patented, offered heating:

  1. The first was the model 01, patented in 1921 (No. 188415), which combined cooking and hot water supply. It could be entirely removed for cleaning by taking off the front plate and doors, together with disconnecting the flow and return pipes. It was available in a single size (29in. to the top of the top-plate, 40in. wide and 20¾in. deep; the oven measured 15in. x 15in. x 13½in.) and three finishes (black; with polished edges; with edges polished and plated). All three were available in a rustless finish, at additional cost, using the Bower-barff [1] process. The cooker contained 2.75 gallons of water with a fuel capacity of 0.5 cu. ft., a maximum B.T.U. of 20,000 per hour, capable of heating 28 gallons per hour (50⁰-120⁰), 22 gallons (50⁰-140⁰) or 18 gallons (50⁰-160⁰). It used the Ideal direct cylinder No. 40, which could be used either horizontally or vertically and made of 18 gauge[2] galvanised steel: it had a 30 gallon capacity, measured 18 inches diameter and 36 inches (approx.) in length. The firm did not market the copper version of the cylinder, which appear to have been a specialised item.
    Ideal Cookaheat Model No 01
    Ideal Cookaheat Model No 01 Dimensions

     

  2. The second was model 1, patented in 1919 (No. 143337) combined cooking, heating and hot-water supply. The latter was provided by an “indirect” system in conjunction with Ideal indirect cylinder Nos. 1, 1C, 2 and 2C. It had a rating of 17,500 B.T.U. equal to 120 sq. ft. of radiation or 20 gallons per hour raised through 90⁰, based on a fuel consumption of 3lbs. of coal per hour.
    Ideal Cookaheat Model No 1
    Ideal Cookaheat Model No 1 Dimensions

    It was available in a single size (29in. to the top of the top-plate, 36 15/16in. wide and 21in. deep; the oven measured 15in. x 15in. x 13½in.) and in three finishes (black; with polished edges; with edges polished and plated).

    The associated Ideal indirect cylinder was available in four models (No. 1, 1c, 2 and 2c), wither of which could be used either horizontally or vertically. Models 1 and 2 were both made of galvanised iron with a 14 gauge[3] body and 12 gauge[4] head and bottom. Model 1 had a 30 gallon capacity and was 38in. long with an 18in. diameter, whilst model 2 held 40 gallons, measuring 42in. in length with a 20in. diameter. Models 1C and 2C were made of copper, both with an 18 gauge[5] head and body and a 14 gauge[6] bottom. Model 1C had the same capacity and dimensions as model 1, whilst model 2C held 40 gallons, measuring 50in. in length and an 18in. diameter.

    Ideal indirect Cylinder, with thorttle valve
    Ideal indirect cylinder dimensions
  3. The second, known as model 2, also patented in 1919 (No. 143337), was a larger version of model 1, with double the heating capacity at 35,000 B.T.U, equal to 240 sq. ft. of radiation or 40 gallons per hour raised through 90⁰, based upon a consumption of 5lbs. of coal per hour.
    Ideal Cookaheat Model No 2
    Ideal Cookaheat Model No 2 Dimensions

    It was available in a single size (33⅛in. to the top of the top-plate, 42¼in. wide and 23½in. deep; the oven measured 16in. x 16in. x 16in.) and in three finishes (black; with polished edges; with edges polished and plated). It used the same indirect cylinders as model 1.

Whilst the firm stopped selling the Cookanheat by the late 1930s, they continued with the Ideal indirect cylinder, increasing the range to six models, three copper and three galvanised steel.

The Architectural Review, Vol 53, June 1923

References:

  1. A certain process for producing upon articles of iron or steel an adherent coating of the magnetic oxide of iron (which is not liable to corrosion by air, moisture, or ordinary acids). This is accomplished by producing, by oxidation at about 1,600°F. in a closed space, a coating containing more or less of the ferric oxide (Fe2O3) and the subsequent change of this in a reduced atmosphere to the magnetic oxide (Fe2O4).

  2. 0.04in./1.02mm.

  3. 0.064in./1.63mm.

  4. 0.081in./2.06mm.

  5. 0.04in./1.02mm.

  6. 0.064in./1.63mm.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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