Wrought Welded Upright Boilers

Designed for providing domestic hot water, the firm offered upwards of 6 models from unknown third-party suppliers. Five of the six were upright cylinder boilers, with one also designed for both hot water and heating; the sixth boiler was a combined boiler and cylinder.

Model No. B1

B1 – Upright Cylinder Boiler for Domestic Hot Water Supply

 

By the mid-1920s, this boiler had reportedly been available for many years and was still proving very popular. It had a waterway bottom, with ample room for cleaning our sediment. There was no waterway between the feed door and fire door, which apparently improved the life of the boiler in areas where incrustation build-up was a problem. This boiler was available in two thicknesses, 5/16in. or ⅜in. plate.

 

Size of Boiler (overall)

Size of Smoke Pipe

(Ins.)

Heating Power in Sq. Ft. Radiation

Heating Power of Boiler per Hour

High (Ins.)

Diameter (Ins.)

50⁰-150⁰ F

(Gallons)

50⁰-100⁰ F

(Gallons)

B.T.U.

34

12

4

90

13

26

12,960

34

14

5

144

21

42

20,730

41

14

5

168

24

48

24,190

37

16

6

180

26

52

25,920

43

16

6

210

30

60

30,240

49

16

6

270

33

66

32,880

44

18

7

270

34

68

32,880

50

18

7

330

48

96

47,520

 

Model No. B2.

B2 – Upright Cylinder Boiler for Domestic Hot Water Supply

 

Model B2 was made specifically for those requiring a cheap but reliable boiler. It had a very simple construction with a top feed. The waterway top was omitted but the waterway bottom was provided.

Size of Boiler (overall)

Size of Smoke Pipe

(Ins.)

Heating Power in Sq. Ft. Radiation

Heating Power of Boiler per Hour

High (Ins.)

Diameter (Ins.)

50⁰-150⁰ F

(Gallons)

50⁰-100⁰ F

(Gallons)

B.T.U.

40

15

6

272

39

78

39,200

46

15

6

337

48

96

48,300

40

18

6

355

51

102

51,100

46

18

6

438

63

126

63,000

46

21

7

564

81

162

81,000

54

24

7

812

116

232

116,900

54

27

8

972

140

280

140,000

54

30

8

1,071

156

312

156,800

 

Model No. B3. 

 

B3 – Upright Cylinder Boiler for Domestic Hot Water Supply or Heating
B3 – Upright Cylinder Boiler for Domestic Hot Water Supply or Heating

 

This boiler, which had a waterway bottom, was made specifically to provide large quantities of hot water, suitable for use in hotels, schools, etc. Due to its strong construction, it was capable of sustaining high pressures. The cross tubes added to the boiler’s efficiency. It could also be used for heating. A bolted-on top was available at additional cost.

Size of Boiler (overall)

Cross Tubes

Size of Smoke Pipe

(Ins.)

Heating Power

Heating Power of Boiler per Hour

High (Ins.)

Diameter (Ins.)

No.

Diameter

(Ins.)

Sq. Ft. Radiation

Ft. run 4in. Pipe

50⁰-150⁰ F

(Gallons)

50⁰-100⁰ F

(Gallons)

B.T.U.

49

24

2

5

7

828

690

119

238

119,000

55

24

3

5

7

1,020

850

147

294

147,000

55

30

3

5

8

1,410

1,175

203

406

203,000

61

30

4

5

8

1,660

1,384

240

480

240,000

55

36

3

6

9

1,880

1,567

272

544

272,000

61

36

4

6

9

2,330

1,952

322

644

322,000

61

42

4

6

10

2,600

2,167

373

746

373,000

67

42

5

7

10

3,210

2,675

462

924

462,000

61

48

6

7

12

3,860

3,217

556

1,112

556,000

67

48

6

8

12

4,340

3,617

625

1,250

625,000

67

54

6

8

12

5,150

4,292

742

1,484

742,000

73

60

6

10

14

6,940

5,784

1,000

2,000

1,000,000

 

The first eight models were made from ⅜in. plate and 5/16in. shell. Models 9-12 were made from ⅜in. plate throughout.

Model No. B4

 

B4 – Combined Boiler and Cylinder for Domestic Hot Water Supply

 

This model had a combined boiler and cylinder in a single unit and in the mid-1920s was apparently becoming a popular design. The boiler had extra-wide waterways, easily cleaned and was reputedly considerably cheaper to install than a separate boiler and cylinder. A waterway bottom could be purchased at extra cost, adding 6in. to the overall height and increasing the water storage as per the table below.

 

Size of Boiler

Size of Smoke Pipe

(Ins.)

Water Storage in Boiler

Heating Power of Boiler per Hour

H (Ins.)

W (Ins.)

D(Ins.)

Without Waterway Bottom (Gallons)

With Waterway Bottom (Gallons)

50⁰-150⁰ F

(Gallons)

50⁰-100⁰ F

(Gallons)

B.T.U.

36

26

18

6

40

50

38

76

38,000

48

26

18

6

60

60

38

76

38,000

48

26

24

6

75

88

47

94

47,000

48

26

30

6

88

105

55

110

55,000

48

26

36

6

100

120

63

126

63,000

48

28

36

6

110

132

72

144

72,000

48

30

36

7

108

131

88

176

88,000

48

28

42

7

130

155

92

184

92,000

48

30

42

7

130

157

110

220

110,000

48

30

48

7

147

178

118

236

118,000

54

33

48

8

182

216

136

272

136,000

54

33

54

8

204

249

148

296

148,000

54

33

60

8

226

269

160

320

160,000

 

Model No. B5

 

B5 – Upright Cylinder Boiler for Domestic Hot Water Supply or Heating

 

This upright cylinder boiler could be used for either supplying hot water or for heating. It was of a very simple construction, with the omission of top and bottom waterways. Because the waterway is carried down below the fire bars, it could be safely used for hot water supply where conditions did not require a waterway bottom. It was available in two thicknesses, 5/16in. or ⅜in. plate.

 

Size of Boiler (overall)

Size of Smoke Pipe

(Ins.)

Heating Power

Heating Power of Boiler per Hour

High (Ins.)

Diameter (Ins.)

Sq. Ft. Radiation

Ft. run 4in. Pipe

50⁰-150⁰ F

(Gallons)

50⁰-100⁰ F

(Gallons)

B.T.U.

23

15

5

140

117

20

40

20,300

28

15

5

190

158

27

54

27,300

33

15

5

240

200

34

68

34,300

28

18

6

260

217

37

74

37,100

34

18

6

330

275

48

96

47,600

40

18

6

410

342

59

118

58,600

 

Model No. B6.

 

B6 – Upright Cylinder Boiler with Self-contained Flues for Domestic Hot Water Supply

 

The boiler’s entry in the firm’s 1925 heating and ventilation catalogue states that:

This Boiler is undoubtedly the best, cheapest and most economical moderate size Boiler made to-day. The Hot Gases from the fire pass round the outside of the Boiler before reaching the flue, and no heat therefore is lost. Each Boiler is complete with special Double Jacket, packed with non-conducting material, so that all the heat is conserved, and the outside remains cool. The Waterways are extra large, and all the deposit can be cleaned out without removing the outer Jacket, all the Flues and Mudholes being readily accessible from the front of the Boiler. These Boilers are delivered with the casings loose when desired for passing into small cellars and through narrow doorways.

The boiler was available with either a dished waterway bottom (as per the illustration) or with a flat waterway bottom. Both variants were available in two thicknesses, 5/16in. or ⅜in. plate.

Size of Boiler (overall)

Size of Smoke Pipe

(Ins.)

Heating Power in Sq. Ft. Radiation

Heating Power of Boiler per Hour

High (Ins.)

Diameter (Ins.)

50⁰-150⁰ F

(Gallons)

50⁰-100⁰ F

(Gallons)

B.T.U.

46

26

7

360

52

104

51,840

46

29

7

540

78

156

77,760

45

32

8

660

95

190

95,000

51

37

8

960

138

276

138,240

51

42

9

1,080

155

310

155,520

51

44

9

1,200

173

346

172,800

57

49

10

1,680

242

484

241,920

57

52

10

1,920

276

552

276,480